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[CNC Chef Video] CAM Toolpath Tips to Improve Tool Life and Surface Finish

Aug 4, 2017   //   by Bob Warfield   //   Beginner, Blog, FeedsSpeeds, Techniques  //  2 Comments

Just released another edition of my monthly video column over on Cutting Tool Engineering magazine. This one is all about some of the ways you can optimize your CAM Toolpaths for better tool life and surface finish.

The CNC Chef: Toolpath Tips from Cutting Tool Engineering on Vimeo.

For more CAM Toolpath Tips, check out the chapter from our free CNC Feeds and Speeds Course:

[ More CAM Toolpath Tips ]

Postscript:

Some folks are commenting that the labels on the deflection diagram suggest climb milling does not push the cutter into the cut while conventional milling does.  Let’s take a closer look and talk about it:

Remember, the cutter moves left to right on both Conventional and Climb Cuts…

Remember, the cutter moves left to right on both Conventional and Climb Cuts.  With that in mind, let’s look at the force vectors, which show the direction of deflection.  Virtually all of the conventional vectors face left.  In other words, they face away from the direction of feed.  In that sense, they’re pulling away from the cut, rather than deflecting into the cut.

The force vectors for climb milling, in comparison, mostly face right, which is the direction of feed.  They are deflecting into the cut and and thereby intensifying the cutting action.

Now granted, the length of the vectors is less for climb than conventional.  That means the forces are lower and there is likely to be less deflection.  That’s why I say in the video that you’re really going to have to test which one works better.

 

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[CNC Chef Video] CAM Toolpath Tips to Improve Tool Life and Surface Finish
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2 Comments

  • Your comment on climb milling deflecting the cutter into the work piece seems to disagree with the illustration you show (which has the force arrows pointing away from the wall for climb,) as well as what I’ve read elsewhere and what my understanding of the cutting forces is.

    • Jonathan, the labels are correct and the cutter does indeed deflect into the workpiece more when climbing. Read my postscript above for a better explanation. I think perhaps the confusion thing is the cutter is feeding left to right in both cases, plus we’re looking at the small component that’s directly vertical rather than much bigger overall tendency to either deflect into the cut (climb) or pull back from the cut (conventional).

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